Older adults diabetes

Duration: 15min 19sec Views: 1798 Submitted: 26.05.2019
Category: BBW
Diabetes is a serious disease, and it affects many older adults. People get diabetes when their blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. The good news is that you can take steps to delay or prevent type 2 diabetes, which is the most common form of the disease to develop in older adults. If you already have diabetes, there are steps you can take to manage the condition and prevent diabetes-related health problems.

Classifications for Diabetes in Older Adults

Older Adults | ADA

The objective is to formulate clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of diabetes in older adults. Diabetes, particularly type 2, is becoming more prevalent in the general population, especially in individuals over the age of 65 years. The underlying pathophysiology of the disease in these patients is exacerbated by the direct effects of aging on metabolic regulation. Similarly, aging effects interact with diabetes to accelerate the progression of many common diabetes complications. Each section in this guideline covers all aspects of the etiology and available evidence, primarily from controlled trials, on therapeutic options and outcomes in this population.

Older Adults

As of , the Center for Disease Control says more than 30 million Americans have some form of diabetes. That number makes up just under 10 percent of the entire American population. Around 25 percent of those 65 and older have diabetes, the CDC says, meaning about 12 million seniors have the condition.
Rather than the classic diabetes symptoms, patients may present with dehydration, dry eyes, dry mouth, confusion, incontinence, and complications such as neuropathy or nephropathy. Jean, 78, has been experiencing urinary incontinence and showing signs of confusion. Signs and Symptoms More than one-quarter of the US population aged 65 and older has diabetes,1 including type 1 and 2, and approximately one-half of older adults have prediabetes. In this population, age-related insulin resistance and impaired pancreatic islet function increase the risk of developing the disease.